Sunday, 29 July 2012

Egmont's Umbrella

Spanish Version of the Pattern

A video tutorial is now available! I recommend reading over the written tutorial first.

 I've made a small change to this pattern. The spike on top of the umbrella is now part of the canopy pattern rather than a separate piece that you have to join on. The umbrella will now look like the blue umbrella shown below. As you can see the spike is a little thicker.



This is the pattern for Egmont’s little umbrella. It’s a bit of a hodge-podge pattern, requiring a bit of crochet, some wire, a bit of stitching and wrapping ... still, I’m pretty proud of the end product.

See how you go with it. If there are any problems, let me know. Wire is used in the umbrella so it’s not an appropriate toy for small children.



Egmont’s Umbrella

Size
11cm/4 ½ in across

Materials
Your favourite colour for the canopy (8ply/DK)
Brown for the handle (8ply/DK)
Light Grey for the stem (8ply/DK)

Crochet Hook – 3.00mm or size that will give you a tight stitch
Tapestry needle
Craft Wire 52cm/20 ½ in
Needle and thread or Glue (Multipurpose or Hot)
Scissors
Pliers

Terminology
***This pattern was written using US crochet terminology***
ch – Chain
dc – Double crochet
hdc – Half double crochet
Rnd – Round
sc – Single crochet
sl st – Slip stitch
st – Stitch. This term covers ch, sc, hdc, sl st and other stitches used in crochet.

Make a ring – The starting point for crocheting in a spiral. Use which ever method you prefer.
* * - Repeat the instructions between the asterisks as directed.
( ) – The number of stitches that should be in a completed round are placed in brackets at the end of that round’s instructions.

Instructions

Canopy (in Favourite Colour)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 4 sc in ring (4)
Rnd 2: *sc in next st, 2 sc in next st*  twice (6)
Rnd 3: *sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st*  twice (8)
Rnd 4: 2 sc in each st around (16)
Rnd 5: *sc in next st, 2 sc in next st*  around (24)
Rnd 6: *sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (32)
Rnd 7: *sc in next 3 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (40)
Rnd 8: *sc in next 4 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (48)
Rnd 9: *sc in next 5 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (56)
Rnd 10-12: sc in each st around
Rnd 13: *sc in next 6 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (64)
Rnd 14: *hdc in next st, sc in next st, sl st in next 3 st, sc in next st, hdc in next st, dc in next st*  eight times (64)
Cut yarn and fasten off. Weave in ends.

Handle (in Brown)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 4 sc in ring (4)
Rnd 2-9: sc in each st around
Cut yarn and fasten off. Weave in ends.

Assembly
***These are guidelines only. Be guided by your own eye at all times.***

Stitch in the ridges. This is optional. The ridges give the umbrella a segmented look and are stitched lines that radiate out from the centre point of the canopy to the outer points. Using a long length of yarn the same colour as the canopy, thread your needle through one of the outer points and whip stitch in a straight line to the spike. Thread your needle through the spike to the opposite side and continue whip stitching to the opposite outer point. Repeat this three times for the other points. Weave in ends.




Make the wire stem. Cut two lengths of wire, each about 3 times the width of the canopy. Fold them in half and twist together. Do not twist all the way to the top. You'll want the ends to be able to spread out into arms that will go under and attach to the canopy. These arms should be a little less than half the width of the canopy.



Spread ends out evenly so that you have four arms. Trim the arms to make them even if necessary. To stop them from poking you, bend the wire ends back with pliers.



Attach the handle and wrap the stem in yarn. Insert the twisted end of the wires into the crocheted handle. Knot a long length of light grey yarn to the crocheted handle, about 7 to 8 times the height of the stem, and wrap it around the wire stem.



When you reach the top, pull the yarn over the top and wrap the yarn back down the stem until you reach the handle again. Secure yarn to the handle and weave in end. Bend the handle into desired shape.



Instead of stitching the yarn to the handle, you can use glue to secure it. Add hot glue or a multipurpose glue that works on both metal and fabric to the end of the stem before you slide on the handle. Then secure the yarn that you're going to wrap around the stem with a dab of glue near the top of the handle. Wrap the yarn as instructed above and then secure the yarn end with another dab of glue when you come back down to the handle. If the glue needs time to dry, secure the yarn in place with a clothes peg.



Attach stem to canopy. Centre the stem on the underside of the canopy. Stitch down the ends of the arms with needle and thread. You will also need to stitch the arms down closer to the centre to ensure that the canopy doesn't lift away from the arms. Again, you can use glue instead of needle and thread. Use pegs to hold the arms in place if your glue needs time to dry.



To finish up, bend and shape the wire, giving the canopy a nice bowl shape.







Copyright © Kim Lapsley 2012

Thursday, 26 July 2012

Three Different Flowers


For the Kreativ Award I was challenged by Shelly to make something I’ve never made before. I decided to make three different flowers.


My first flower was a Grevillea. Grevillea’s are native to Australia and have beautiful flowers, with long stem-like structures that unfurl as they bloom. They are very pretty and have, I think, a slightly alien quality. This pattern is by Camelia Shanahan and can be found here at melibondre.com.


My second flower, which also happens to be my favourite type of flower, was Lavender. I used this pattern by Melissa Armstrong over on mamishkaworkshop.blogspot.com. They turned out quite cute and bubbly and remind me a little of a Dr Seuss landscape. They make very pretty bookmarks.


My third and final flower is an Easter Lily. This is my favourite of all three. The flower comes together beautifully in the pattern, which is very easy to follow. Ideas for little sprite creatures kept popping into my head as I made this. The flower would make a beautiful headpiece for a little elf. The pattern is by Tamara Kelly and can be found here at mooglyblog.com.

I very much enjoyed this challenge. It's good for the soul to try something different every now and then. Thanks, Shelly!

Sunday, 22 July 2012

One Inch Mouse


This is the pattern for Egmont’s faithful mouse Emmy. There is hardly anything to this pattern. It is very simple and quick. It’s great for using up scrap bits of yarn and would make a sweet little gift. I could even see these little guys working as quirky little brooches.

Next week I’ll post the pattern for Egmont’s Umbrella





One Inch Mouse

Size
2.5cm/1in long

Skill Level
Easy. This is a very simple pattern, using single crochet throughout. The small size does make stuffing and joining a little tricky.

Materials
Yarn
White or grey, 8ply (DK)
Pink, 8ply (DK)
Blue, 8ply (DK)

Crochet Hook – 3.00mm
Filling
Tapestry needle

Terminology
***This pattern was written using US crochet terminology***
ch – Chain
Rnd - Round
sc – Single crochet
sc2tog – Single crochet two stitches together.
sl st – Slip stitch
st – Stitch. This term covers ch, sc, sl st and other stitches used in crochet.

Make a ring – The starting point for crocheting in a spiral. Use which ever method you prefer.
* * - Repeat the instructions between the asterisks as directed.
( ) – The number of stitches that should be in a completed round are placed in brackets at the end of that round’s instructions.

Instructions

Body (in White or Grey)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 4 sc in ring (4)
Rnd 2: *sc in next st, 2 sc in next st*  twice (6)
Rnd 3: 2 sc in each st around (12)
Rnd 4-5: sc in each st around
Start stuffing. You might need to keep a finger pressed down on the stuffing to stop it from popping out as you do the next round.
Rnd 6: sc2tog around (6)
Finish stuffing firmly. Cut yarn and weave through remaining stitches, pulling tight to close up hole. Fasten off and weave in ends.

Ears (in White or Grey)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc in ring (6)
Sl st in next st. Cut yarn and fasten off, leaving a tail to use when joining the ears to the body. Make two.

Assembly
***These are guidelines only. Be guided by your own eye at all times.***

Join the ears to the body. They sit a little less than halfway up the body from the nose, between the third and fourth rows.













Add tail and nose. Take a length of pink yarn and thread from the back of the mouse to the front. The yarn sticking out the back of the mouse will be the tail. Use the yarn sticking out the front to make a nose, just by doing a couple of stitches.



 










Add the eyes. Use a bit of blue yarn to stitch in some eyes.













And that's how you make a One Inch Mouse :)

Copyright © Kim Lapsley 2012

Thursday, 19 July 2012

Biff is Ready




Biff is now ready for sale. You can find him on Etsy here in my new store and on Ravelry. A big thank you to my testers Claudia, Jenny (lubbsen.blogspot.com), Lisa (kanoschl.blogspot.com) and Shelly (craftgirl78.wordpress.com). You guys did a fantastic job and I’m very lucky to have had such amazing crocheters testing my pattern.

I’ve been playing around with the blog all day as you might have noticed. I’ve changed the banner and the background colour. I’m hoping the layout looks a little cleaner. Also, you can now find links to my Etsy Store, Ravelry and Flickr in the sidebar.

And that’s it for now. Have a good rest of the week, everybody!

Sunday, 15 July 2012

Challenge Accepted!




Shelly over at craftgirl78.wordpress.com has nominated me for the Kreativ Award. Thank you! I am all giggles and smiles – I am so happy that you think my blog is worthy of this. I am also really excited. Shelly has done some research and gone back to the original rules for this award. They are as follows:
  1. Thank the blogger who nominates you and link back to their site.
  2. Nominate four more creative bloggers for this award and link to their sites.
  3. Explain why you are nominating these four (and please not “I like their blog” -  be a bit more… creative with it!)
  4. Set your four nominated bloggers a creative challenge that they must complete in order to accept the award.
  5. Blog about the challenge and how you have met it.

Something New
Shelly’s challenge is to make something you have never made before. Inspired by Shelly, who is making a flower a day for a year, I have decided to crochet three flowers. I usually make goofy things so it will be nice to make something pretty for a change. It’s a small challenge, I know, but I have a couple of big projects coming up soon so I needed to keep it short and sweet. I will be completing the flowers before the 27th and will only claim my award when they are finished :)

The Award Ceremony
I’ve been nominated for two other awards previously but I wasn’t up to the task of nominating the number of blogs required. This time however I knew exactly the blogs I wanted to share with everyone. Two of the following bloggers have helped me out with testing and two have encouraged my blogging by reaching out in some way. They are all incredibly creative. So it’s time to share the love =D

Ahem. Please be upstanding as the names are read.

Yufang at hollywood-cerise.blogspot.com: (there is raucous applause, wolf whistling and fist pumping) Yufang writes on a variety of topics and her blog is a bright and beautiful experience. I am nominating her for her lovely crochet patterns, particularly her Little Kitty Marie. There is a real sweetness in the design which I admire.

Aisha at isitatoy.blogspot.com: (everyone in the crowd starts waving their hands in the air like they just don’t care) She has a recipe for Choc-banana loaf and crochet patterns for owls. Need I say more – no, but I will. Funny enough, while she has some great recipes and cute patterns on her blog, I nominate her for the beautiful photos she shares.

Lisa at kanoschl.blogspot.com: (everybody cheers and people start throwing coloured streamers in the air) The photos are always beautiful, the projects are always impeccable. Her sewing projects are gorgeous and make me want to improve my very poor sewing skills. I nominate her for her awesome pencil cases.

Jenny at lubbsen.blogspot.com: (the crowd starts chanting J.E.N.N.Y) I have a very specific reason for nominating Jenny. She has a wonderful blog and she is an excellent crocheter and deserves to be nominated just on that, however, I am nominating her for one particular project. Jenny made a girlfriend for Biff the Angry Bear. She’s purple and red and she’s named Bea. She put a creative twist on one of my patterns. I love it!

(The crowd falls into a contented silence, more than satisfied with the outcomes of the award ceremony.)

The Little Things




It is always lovely to take time to appreciate the little things. My challenge to you, if you choose to accept it, is to blog about some little thing that has inspired you. It could be a beautifully designed piece of jewellery or a malformed button. It could be a note from a loved one or your favourite flower or a funny shaped stain on your collar. It could be something incredibly ordinary that has an extraordinary story behind it. Explain how this little thing inspired you. I think delving into your creative process is a suitable challenge for this Kreativ Award :)

Does anybody else feel all aglow after that celebration of creativity? No - just me then hehe. I think this would be the perfect time to pick up my 3.00mm. Until next time ... :)

Thursday, 12 July 2012

Egmont the Elephant


Here is the pattern for Egmont, the Henry Mancini loving elephant with an irrational fear of the letter E. If you have any problems let me know.

 


Egmont the Elephant

Size
7cm/3in tall

Skill Level
Easy to Moderate. There are nine parts. Some parts are quite small so the crocheting and joining can be fiddly.

Note on yarn and hook size
I crochet with a light worsted (DK) weight yarn. You can use a slightly heavier or lighter yarn as long as you use the same type of yarn for the different colours. This will ensure your toy is in proportion. Use a hook size that will give you a nice firm stitch. The 3.00mm is my favourite hook.

Materials
Yarn
Grey
White

Crochet hook – 3.00mm or preferred size
Filling
Black felt
Tapestry needle
Craft glue and/or thread and sharp needle for attaching felt

Terminology
***This pattern was written using US crochet terminology***
ch – Chain
Rnd – Round
sc – Single crochet
sc2tog – Single crochet two stitches together.
sl st – Slip stitch
st – Stitch. This term covers ch, sc, hdc, sl st and other stitches used in crochet.

Make a ring – The starting point for crocheting in a spiral. Use which ever method you prefer.
* * - Repeat the instructions between the asterisks as directed.
( ) – The number of stitches that should be in a completed round are placed in brackets at the end of that round’s instructions.

Instructions

Body (in Grey)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc in ring (6)
Rnd 2: 2 sc in each st around (12)
Rnd 3: *sc in next st, 2 sc in next st*  around (18)
Rnd 4: *sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (24)
Rnd 5: *sc in next 3 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (30)
Rnd 6-10: sc in each st around
Rnd 11: *sc in next 4 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (36)
Rnd 12: *sc in next 5 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (42)
Rnd 13-15: sc in each st around
Rnd 16: *sc in next 5 st, sc2tog*  around (36)
Rnd 17: *sc in next 4 st, sc2tog*  around (30)
Rnd 18: *sc in next 3 st, sc2tog*  around (24)
Start stuffing.
Rnd 19: *sc in next 2 st, sc2tog*  around (18)
Rnd 20: *sc in next st, sc2tog*  around (12)
Finish stuffing firmly.
Rnd 21: sc2tog around (6)
Weave yarn through remaining stitches and pull tight to close up hole. Fasten off and weave in ends.

Ears (in Grey)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc in ring (6)
Rnd 2: 2 sc in each st around (12)
Rnd 3: *sc in next st, 2 sc in next st*  around (18)
Rnd 4: *sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st*  around (24)
Rnd 5: sc in each st around
Rnd 6: *sc in next 2 st, sc2tog*  around (18)
Rnd 7: sc in each st around
Rnd 8: *sc in next st, sc2tog*  around (12)
Rnd 9: *sc in next st, sc2tog*  around (8)
Rnd 10: sc in each st around
Rnd 11: *sc2tog, sc in next 2 st*  twice (6)
Cut yarn, leaving a long tail. Leave unstuffed. Weave yarn through remaining stitches, pull tight to close up hole and fasten off. Thread yarn up through the ear, pulling it out about a quarter way down from the top of the ear. Make two.

 















Legs (in Grey)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc in ring (6)
Rnd 2: 2 sc in each st around (12)
Rnd 3: *sc in next st, 2 sc in next st*  around (18)
Rnd 4: sc in each st around
Rnd 5: *sc in next 4 st, sc2tog*  around (15)
Rnd 6: sc in each st around
Cut yarn, leaving a long tail, and fasten off. Stuff firmly. Make two.

Arms (in Grey)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc in ring (6)
Rnd 2: *sc in next 2 st, 2 sc in next st*  twice (8)
Rnd 3-7: sc in each st around
Cut yarn, leaving a long tail, and fasten off. Leave unstuffed. Make two.

Trunk (in Grey)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc in ring (6)
Rnd 2-3: sc in each st around
Rnd 4: 2 sc in each st around (12)
Rnd 5: sc in each st around
Rnd 6: sc2tog around (6)
Cut yarn, leaving a long tail, and fasten off. Leave unstuffed.

Trunk End (in Grey)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc in ring
Cut yarn, leaving a tail, and fasten off. Attach the trunk end to the tip of the trunk. The trunk end is a small circle. Don’t stitch over the edge of the circle when attaching to the trunk but instead stitch through the underside of the circle. Use the pictures as a guide.
























Tail (in Grey)
Chain 4.
Row 1: sl st in second chain from the hook, sl st in next 2 chains
Cut yarn, leaving a tail, and fasten off. Tie a small piece of yarn to the end of the tail and unravel it to make a tuft of hair. Trim to desired length.















Big Eye ( in White)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc in ring (6)
Rnd 2: 2 sc in each st around (12)
Sl st in next st and pull through yarn. Leave a tail for joining to the body.

Small Eye (in White)
Make a ring.
Rnd 1: 6 sc in ring (6)
Sl st in next st and pull through yarn. Leave a tail for joining to the body.
You can now attach a small circle of black felt to each eye to make the pupils, using needle and thread or glue. They should sit off-centre, close to the edge of the eye.


Assembly
***These are guidelines only. Be guided by your own eye at all times.***

Join arms to body. The top of the arms sit on the narrowest part of the body – Egmont’s neck. Pin the arms to the body and stitch the opening of the arms flat to the body using the tails of yarn left on the arms. I’ve stitched the right arm on at an angle so that it points upwards.
















Join the legs to the body. Don’t forget to stuff the legs before you attach them. The legs sit on the bottom front of the body. Pin and stitch on using the tails of yarn left on the legs.















Join the ears to the body. The ears should be slightly cupped and sit just above the arms. The ears are stitched on with the tail of yarn that was threaded up through the ear. When attaching, work your way down the ear from where the tail of yarn was pulled out and stop attaching where the ear starts to narrow.














Join the eyes to the body. The bottom of the eyes should line up with the tops of the arms. The eyes should sit close together. Pin on body and stitch on using tails of yarn left on the eyes.














Join the trunk to the body. The trunk sits just below the eyes. Pin to body and stitch the opening of the trunk flat to the body using the tail of yarn left on the trunk.














Join the tail to the body. The tail sits on the bottom back of the body. Stitch on using tail of yarn left on the tail.














And you're done! Now all he needs is his faithful mouse Emmy and his trusty Umbrella.

Copyright © Kim Lapsley 2012

An Irrational Fear of the Letter E




This is Egmont and his faithful mouse Emmy. Egmont loves eating peanut butter, listening to Henry Mancini and Beethoven, and watching Sesame Street. Egmont does have a tiny problem. 



  
He has a fear of the letter E. He believes that it is out to get him …



 
… and he can’t quite shake the feeling that it’s following him.



 
It’s a terrible thing for an elephant named Egmont to be afraid of the letter E. He seeks comfort in an old umbrella, which, while not offering much protection from enormous, evil Es, does stop him from constantly checking over his shoulder. 

I'll be posting patterns for Egmont, Emmy and the Umbrella.

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